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Severe Weather Procedures

BE PREPARED FOR SEVERE WEATHER

The City of Algonac does not have, operate, or manage any public storm shelters and recommends to shelter-in-place during times of severe weather.

Sheltering-in-place provides the shortest distance to safety and means to take shelter where you are, remaining inside your home, workplace or other building you find yourself in when the disaster takes place.

In the event you live in a trailer or mobile home park, or apartment complex, we encourage you to visit with the owner or manager of the complex to identify shelter areas. Neighbors and/or family close by can also provide an area for shelter.

This action should take place prior to any tornado warning or severe weather in the immediate area and should be part of your Severe Weather Safety Plan that every family should have in place to assist in times of severe weather.

Tornado watch means a tornado is possible in your area, be prepared to take shelter.

Tornado warning is when a tornado is actually occurring, take shelter immediately.

It is critical to understand once a tornado warning is issued you must take shelter immediately; this is not the time to drive looking for shelter.

Advance warnings for tornadoes can range from 17 minutes on a good day to less than 5 minutes on a bad day. The City does not want citizens/residents driving at the time the tornado is in the area, looking for shelter. Tornadoes occurring at night are often rain wrapped and impossible to see. Hail also accompanies many tornadoes, which increases the risk of driving.

 

STAY INFORMED AND BE ALERT TO CHANGING WEATHER CONDITIONS

  • Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or to commercial radio or television newscasts for the latest information.
  • Be aware of approaching storms and look for the following danger signs; dark greenish sky, large hail, large, dark low-lying rotating cloud, loud roar similar to a freight train.
  • A 3 minutes siren means take cover immediately.

 

If you are in: Then:
A structure (residence, small building, school, nursing home, hospital, factory, shopping center, high rise building. Go to a pre-designated shelter area such as a safe room, basement, storm cellar, or the lowest building level.  If there is no basement, go to the center of an interior room on the lowest level (closet, interior hallway) away from corners, windows, doors, and outside walls.  Put as many walls as possible between you and the outside.   Get under a sturday table and use your arms to protect your head and neck.  DO NOT open windows.
A vehicle, trailer, or mobile home. Get out immediately and go to the lowest floor or sturdy, nearby building or a storm shelter.  Mobile homes, even f tied down, offer little protection from tornadoes.
The outside with no shelter. Lie flat in a nearby ditch or depression and cover your head with your hands.  Be aware of the potential flooding.  Do not get under an overpass or bridge.  You are safer in a low, flat location.  Watch out for flying debris.  Flying debris from tornadoes causes most fatalities and injuries. 

 

SIREN SOUNDINGS

Tone Definition

  • The standards "wail" tone signifies a tornado warning has been issued for the entire warning period.
  • The siren sounding shall last for three (3) minutes.  Sirens will not sound for the entire warning period.

Public Actions

  • When sirens are sounded the public should seek shelter in a suitable building or area for their protection
  • The public should ensure they have direct access (in shelter) to AM/FM radio and/or television to keep updated on the situation.

All-Clear Signals

  • THERE IS NO SIREN SOUNDING TO COMMUNICATE AN "ALL-CLEAR" OR TORNADO WARNING EXPIRATION.
  • The public will receive warning expiration notifications from local radio and television stations.

Second Soundings

  • Sirens should be sounded again under the following conditions:
    a.  The tornado warning is extended or re-issued
    b.  A tornado is spotted or confirmed "on the ground" in the area
    c.  The National Weather Service issues a "Tornado Emergency" for a community